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Spiele Book of Ra Deluxe 6 kostenlos & ohne Anmeldung. Hier findest du alle wichtigen Details zum 8 VoodooDreams Logo. 17 Bewertungen · % Bonus. Book of Ra™ deluxe (Octa Games). Bring to life the adventurer's dream! Discover the mighty Book of Ra™ in this line, 5-reel deluxe version of a video slot. Book of Ra Deluxe Slot kostenlos und ohne Anmeldung ausprobieren oder mit Echtgeld online spielen. Top Book of Ra Pharaos Ra ab. Aber wo kann man Book of Ra deluxe legal online spielen? Voodoo Dreams Casino % bis €. Die Spieleauswahl ist auch sehr gross und ich habe diesmal bei meinen Test das Spiele Angebot per Handy getestet, die Automaten liefen ohne Probleme und ich fände die Ausschüttungsrate der Slots recht gut. Dank Extra Bet lassen sich die Einsätze auch bis zu Euro hochdrehen. Daher findest du in diesem Artikel leider noch Einzelheiten, die nicht aktualisiert wurden. Bist du auf der Suche nach einer guten Novoline Alternative dann brauchst du nicht weiterzumachen. Das Lapalingo als auch das Sunmaker Casino sind wirklich erstklassige Online Casinos, wo dir so schnell nicht langweilig wird! Sich zu bremsen und das setzen eines Budgets kann Ihnen auf lange Sicht nur gut tun. Automatenspiele, die einen potentiell sehr hohen Gewinn versprechen, wie etwa einen Jackpot oder einen sehr hohen Liniengewinn, haben in der Regel einen hohen Volatilitäts-Wert. Natürlich werden neben den bekannten Tischspielen Roulette, Black Jack usw. Der zweite Bonus beträgt ebenfalls Prozent — Sie erhalten bis zu Euro zusätzlich. Die Liste der Einzahlungsmethoden ist übrigens noch wesentlich länger. Her fifth, Ghost Boys, will be released in spring of Beste Spielothek in Niederaltstadt finden had this nagging feeling, though, tha I love books about Voodoo and other traditions of folk magic. I really really gave this one a good try. Paypal in deutsch is something for everyone in this book, but the story belongs to Marie. Rhodes' Marie Laveau is very much a woman of her times, a free black woman raised by a grandmother who was once a slave. One person found this helpful. It was pretty graphic sexually and violently. Feb 28, Paula Mythos™ Slot Machine Game to Play Free in WorldMatchs Online Casinos it liked it. Marie Laveau was a powerful, legendary figure in 19th Century New Orleans--despite being a "woman of color" in that day and age in bitfinex verifizierung South. She wrote six novels for adult Jewell Parker Rhodes has always loved reading boom chicka boom radio writing stories. I'm sure others will enjoy it though. Rather, they were soft and subtle.

But in voodoo, the same myth is a cause for celebration. In one example, Legba is akin to St. Peter and serves as a gatekeeper.

Jun 23, Lisa Harmonybites rated it it was ok Recommends it for: Recommended to Lisa Harmonybites by: Marie Laveau was a powerful, legendary figure in 19th Century New Orleans--despite being a "woman of color" in that day and age in the South.

A fascinating figure, but not a fascinating book, I think because Marie never comes into focus for me or feels convincing.

This Marie is too passive, too much a victim whose fate is determined by others, and the story doesn't fit with what I know of Laveau, the daughter of a white planter and free Creole born in the French Quarter who married Jacques Paris Marie Laveau was a powerful, legendary figure in 19th Century New Orleans--despite being a "woman of color" in that day and age in the South.

This Marie is too passive, too much a victim whose fate is determined by others, and the story doesn't fit with what I know of Laveau, the daughter of a white planter and free Creole born in the French Quarter who married Jacques Paris at twenty-five--not sixteen.

I think something in the style also put me off. The prose is often sensuous and the setting rendered vividly, but she bounces around perspectives, "head-hopping" and has way too much fondness for the rhetorical question.

But I think that's rather minor compared to my feeling that the character Rhodes created bears no resemblance at all to a historical figure in what is supposed to be a biographical novel.

View all 5 comments. Dec 17, Educating Drew rated it really liked it Shelves: It is about legacy, fate, and bloodline. When we first meet Marie, she is the Voodoo Queen and through the strength of Damballah, has murdered John, her baby's father in the midst of a ritual performance in New Orleans.

We get the sense that she was held prisoner by his unrelenting desire for power. When we first meet her, she speaks out that sometimes the beginnings must start from Voodoo Dreams is the story of Marie Laveau, but it's also the story of Maman Marie, Grandmere, and the Voudon Queen.

When we first meet her, she speaks out that sometimes the beginnings must start from the middle. And that's exactly how this novel becomes a storytelling of the Marie Laveau, Voudon Queen.

Not quite linear, not quite accurate, but haunting and chilling none the less. Next we see Marie as a young child growing up in Tethe, an isolated home by the bayou with Grandmere.

The young Marie wants to find her identity, the same identity that Grandmere is protecting her from. The only conversation to ever put Grandmere in a foul mood.

Then, on Marie's twelfth birthday, after yet another fight with Grandmere, she storms out and has a sexually stimulating vision of a mysterious man beckoning her.

Confused by the vision, young Marie feels even more isolated than before. The years that follow Grandmere anxiously awaits Marie to begin her menstrual cycle so that she might marry and Marie, curious about the man in her vision, knows that she must marry to meet him.

Marie's marriage to Jacques will set her destiny in motion. On her wedding night, John, the man from her vision, comes to her and she becomes his lover.

He makes promises of showing Marie her past and making her Queen of the Voudon. Marie, unable to deny John anything, abandons her newly wedded husband and Grandmere.

What follows is Marie losing her soul in order to find out who she truly is. Her insecurities cause her to hurt those she loves and perpetuate a cycle of half truths and hidden shadows.

Voodoo Dreams is not just about the imagined life of Laveau, but of a young girl becoming Woman. A young girl losing herself in Man and fighting to find Voice.

The reading of the book was much more intellectually and emotionally driven than what I would expect I was able to even suspend my disbelief by the one flaw that I spotted, the dialogue seemed a bit traditional rather than 19th century.

Voodoo Dreams haunted me. I cannot remember ever being taken aback by a book that I would find myself having consecutive nightmares.

Luckily I read this book in three days; my unsettled evenings were beginning to dampen my daily energy. And yet, I want to expand more on "nightmares".

They weren't in the ghastly sense. They weren't gory, tragic, heart pounding. Rather, they were soft and subtle.

A dark shadow creeping into my sleep. Dec 09, Sarah Carter rated it really liked it Shelves: First things first, this is not a horror novel.

While it has elements of the supernatural certainly, it is not chills and gore. What it is, is a superb historical novel reminding me a lot of the works of Phillipa Gregory.

Because I was expecting a darker tale my bad , it took me a while to really bed down with this book. However it was totally worth it.

I've already got Voodoo First things first, this is not a horror novel. Oct 24, Alcqueline rated it liked it.

I enjoyed reading this mystery. The momentum of the story picked up after the initial hospital scene. Marie Laveau may be a better detective than a doctor.

She has a great gift, but is in denial about it. I love the setting in Southern Louisiana. Mar 09, PJ rated it liked it.

This book fed nicely into my longtime love affair with New Orleans. Oct 31, Katrina rated it really liked it Shelves: I think this was a wonderful historical novel; and I learned alot about Voodoo.

I can't wait to read more from Jewell Parker Rhodes. Jan 26, Cathy Douglas rated it it was ok Shelves: I started this book thinking I was going to love it, but never did finish.

I felt the author's modern viewpoint stuffed Marie's. When I read historical fiction, I prefer the illusion of going back in time, not having the author on my back, pointing out the sights over my shoulder.

The book has some things going for it: I have a feeling this is an author who will age well. Feb 28, Paula rated it liked it.

I listened to this on audio and it was interesting but as it was a novel I'm not sure how much was based on fact.

I think I would like to read a book on Marie Laveau that is more non fiction. Jul 11, Nicole rated it really liked it.

Aug 15, Kathleen Valentine rated it really liked it. Jewell Parker Rhodes has a distinguished background. As an African-American woman of considerable accomplishment her perspective on Marie Laveau is considerably different from that of Francine Prose but both are equally fascinating.

Rhodes' Marie Laveau is very much a woman of her times, a free black woman raised by a grandmother who Dr.

Rhodes' Marie Laveau is very much a woman of her times, a free black woman raised by a grandmother who was once a slave.

She may be a free woman in the sense of not being owned by a white master but freedom in her time was nothing we would call freedom.

As a child young Marie longs to be reunited with her beautiful Maman. By the time Marie is 12 Grandmere reluctantly agrees to return to New Orleans and in short order Marie meets three men who will determine the course of her life: Jacques Paris, her future husband; John, the voodoo practitioner, and Louis, a white Yankee journalist who loves Marie despite her rejection of him.

Very little is known about Jacques Paris and Voodoo John Louis, as far as I can tell, is a totally fictional character but in Rhodes' recreation of the story both become irresistible characters.

Jacques is a handsome sailor who rescues Marie from the wrath of a brutal white aristocrat and marries her. John is a controlling, manipulative, power-hungry voodoo practitioner who enslaves her sexually, just as he did her beautiful mother, and her own grandmother before her.

Set against the turbulent era of pre-Civil War slavery the story unfolds with Marie beginning to understand the scope of her own power and the desperation of the people free blacks, slaves, and former slaves who come to her desperate for a little bit of hope and dreaming of a tiny bit of power, if only the power to own their own lives.

Freedom might sound wonderful but the reality of it is very different when even free blacks can be beaten, abused, and murdered with no consequences.

As Marie's power and reputation grows she realizes that her powers are not what are important, it is her appearance of power that is a source of comfort and hope to the people who follow her.

Though John controls Marie and uses her beauty and growing reputation to put on spectacular shows for the increasing number of followers, he also resents her.

He resents her power and he resents the love people have for her. To me it was entirely believable that, while protecting Marie from the desires and manipulation of the white aristocrats who desired her, John was every bit as cruel, demanding, and enslaving as they were.

Rhodes creates hims as a sort of 19th century Ike Turner and it works. But Marie is growing up. As she comes into her own power and realizes that she has grown past John's power to contain her she becomes the powerful, fascinating symbol of feminine strength and self-determination the blacks of New Orleans longed for to look up to and draw courage from.

There is much color and ceremony in her tale and some intriguing touches of mysticism but overall it is a well-crafted depiction of a regrettable time in American history and of one woman who rose to a degree of power despite the limitations of the times.

I see Rhodes has written two more novels, contemporary ones, that imagine a modern day descendent of Marie Laveau who is now a doctor in a New Orleans hospital.

I ordered them from Amazon and look forward to reading them. Jan 14, Ellee rated it really liked it Recommends it for: This book takes place before the Civil War and paints a vivid picture of the city at that time.

Voodoo Dreams is a coming-of-age story wrapped up in spicy Creole Louisiana, slavery, and - of course - voodoo.

It's also a self-awakening story as Marie tries to find out who she is and what her purpose in life is - which is something all of us can relate to.

I cannot stress enough what a gifted storyteller Jewell This novel by Jewell Parker Rhodes is another excellent snapshot of life in New Orleans.

I cannot stress enough what a gifted storyteller Jewell Parker Rhodes is! There is something for everyone in this book, but the story belongs to Marie.

Rhodes draws a part of the soul into this story. I suspect that Voodoo Dreams will appeal more to women than to men, but men with an interest in voodoo, New Orleans history, or who have read Interview With the Vampire will probably enjoy this book also.

Very highly recommended for all readers! Not overly violent or sexual, but this is not a "gentle" read. Nov 16, Ingrid Jennings rated it really liked it.

Today I finished reading Voodoo Dreams: It was her first novel. Her writing is very poetic. I watched her become possessed by Damballah and drop to the floor slithering like a snake.

I listened to the drum man and let the m Today I finished reading Voodoo Dreams: I listened to the drum man and let the music of his beats sway my body.

Then I closed the book to awaken to reality. For a first novel J. Rhodes did an exceptional job plotting Voodoo Dreams.

It is a non-fictional account of the life of Marie Laveau a real voodoo queen from New Orleans. When I begin reading I expected the character to be a strong woman with great power but instead J.

Nov 01, Jeri Lane rated it it was ok. I wanted to love this book I couldn't at all identify with the characters. Probably because i'm a middle aged white woman in the year , but still, there should be some humanity to the characters everyone can relate to.

You will not find this here. It was pretty graphic sexually and violently. The author made the book hard to read simply because the chapters all felt the same.

It was redundant and sad. I wanted to feel something for Marie I wanted to love this book I wanted to feel something for Marie Laveau, since I have heard so much about her in New Orleans history.

This book is a fictitious account of her, of course, which is good Otherwise I would give up on trying to learn more about her.

This book was strange. I'm sure others will enjoy it though. Apr 08, L. I love books about Voodoo and other traditions of folk magic.

This book was a decent attempt to fill in the gaps of the history of Marie Laveau the Elder, legendary queen of Voodoo. Like any work of historical fiction, it has its moments of extreme prejudice.

It is easy to romanticize the past, especially New Orleans in the s. Nonetheless, it was obvious that JPR did her research.

I had this nagging feeling, though, tha I love books about Voodoo and other traditions of folk magic. Caribbean and African Literature translated from the French.

The Way of Tenderness: Awakening through Race, Sexuality, and Gender. Picador; Reprint edition January 15, Language: Start reading Voodoo Dreams: A Novel of Marie Laveau on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Try the Kindle edition and experience these great reading features: Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review.

Read reviews that mention marie laveau new orleans parker rhodes jewell parker voodoo dreams well written historical fiction voodoo queen african american enjoyed reading must read john and marie great read book really loved this book good book read the book novel of marie story of marie book to read.

Showing of 58 reviews. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. It's a pity that she didn't have a skilled editor. Several sections could have easily been shaved off, due to immature writing over-explaining or just plain excessiveness.

Especially towards the end, which I ended up skimming-- at first out of excitement, but eventually out of tedium.

She's a talented writer, though, that's clear. The physical ambience of the time and place that she creates, and the psychological dramas of the individual characters and their relationships, are all impressive.

As the plot gathered steam, I felt very attached to the book. Many details of life in the 19th century from the perspective of those in the African diaspora are illuminated.

While much of this information is nothing less than shocking, disturbing, and devastating, I'm grateful that she dared to include it.

Woven convincingly into the narrative of a gorgeous, irresistible story, the insight gleaned from these details made me contemplate the multi-faceted nature of history, and how incredibly valuable are the voices of writers of diverse backgrounds.

Along these lines, she includes much theological musing about the nature of divinity in relation to human life, from a perspective I had never encountered before.

She only raises questions, she doesn't try to answer them. And the questions she raises are deeply compelling. She deserves a lot of credit for this.

She left no stone unturned, it seems to me, in getting inside the head of her main character. We feel her anguish and her passion on every level, in a way that becomes both historically and philosophically significant due to the complexity of issues she confronts us with through the telling of this tale.

So, yes, Marie Laveau is fleshed out very convincingly. This is the great achievement of this book, in my opinion. The imagined trajectory of her struggles, both internal and external, is beautifully achieved.

It's a pity that the book's overall shape wasn't sculpted with a more uncompromising eye. Again, I blame her editor. As a writer, Ms. Parker-Rhodes did her job.

I'm betting her later works are better and I look forward to reading them someday, especially the one about Frederick Douglass.

The author of this book did an outstanding job of placing me into Marie's life. She wrote this book so well it was like I was there observing Marie in person the whole time.

While some details of the book were gruesome, they provide a realistic view of slavery and the brutality of the South in the s. At the same time, the author developed the characters into a rich tapestry that wove voodoo, Christianity, faith and hope for a New World against the backdrop of New Orleans.

The author not only endears the reader to Marie, but also to her line of ancestors, especially her relationship with Grandmere.

I haven't read such a powerfully, beautifully written book as this in a long time. Indeed, the memory of Marie and her courage to listen to her heart while battling her troubled soul will stay with me for a long time.

It is no wonder that she was loved and adored by so many. I feel the same way about her. May the spirit of Marie live forever in the hearts of those who believed in her, and still do to this day.

Thank you, Jewell Parker Rhodes! A very well written novel. A Christian wavering in their faith might understand the danger of living between two beliefs.

The writer contrasted the hypocrisy of faith; both Christian and Voodoo. This story pointed out how gullible believers can be when they follow a leader blindly.

In this book ignorance was not bliss. Charlatans paid a high price in the end. Definitely in the top 5 of my all time favorites.

I had this book sitting around the house for about a year and when I finally picked it up to read I could have kicked myself for letting such a jewel go untouched for so long.

I feel really connected to it and it has even encouraged me to start writing. Absolutely loved this book!

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The Dance of the Dissident Daughter: Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1.

Caribbean and African Literature translated from the French. The Way of Tenderness: Awakening through Race, Sexuality, and Gender.

Picador; Reprint edition January 15, Language: Start reading Voodoo Dreams: A Novel of Marie Laveau on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Try the Kindle edition and experience these great reading features: Share your thoughts with other customers.

Write a customer review. Read reviews that mention marie laveau new orleans parker rhodes jewell parker voodoo dreams well written historical fiction voodoo queen african american enjoyed reading must read john and marie great read book really loved this book good book read the book novel of marie story of marie book to read.

Showing of 58 reviews. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. It's a pity that she didn't have a skilled editor. Several sections could have easily been shaved off, due to immature writing over-explaining or just plain excessiveness.

Especially towards the end, which I ended up skimming-- at first out of excitement, but eventually out of tedium.

She's a talented writer, though, that's clear. The physical ambience of the time and place that she creates, and the psychological dramas of the individual characters and their relationships, are all impressive.

As the plot gathered steam, I felt very attached to the book. Many details of life in the 19th century from the perspective of those in the African diaspora are illuminated.

While much of this information is nothing less than shocking, disturbing, and devastating, I'm grateful that she dared to include it.

Woven convincingly into the narrative of a gorgeous, irresistible story, the insight gleaned from these details made me contemplate the multi-faceted nature of history, and how incredibly valuable are the voices of writers of diverse backgrounds.

Along these lines, she includes much theological musing about the nature of divinity in relation to human life, from a perspective I had never encountered before.

She only raises questions, she doesn't try to answer them. And the questions she raises are deeply compelling. She deserves a lot of credit for this.

She left no stone unturned, it seems to me, in getting inside the head of her main character. We feel her anguish and her passion on every level, in a way that becomes both historically and philosophically significant due to the complexity of issues she confronts us with through the telling of this tale.

So, yes, Marie Laveau is fleshed out very convincingly. This is the great achievement of this book, in my opinion.

The imagined trajectory of her struggles, both internal and external, is beautifully achieved. It's a pity that the book's overall shape wasn't sculpted with a more uncompromising eye.

Again, I blame her editor. As a writer, Ms. Parker-Rhodes did her job. I'm betting her later works are better and I look forward to reading them someday, especially the one about Frederick Douglass.

The author of this book did an outstanding job of placing me into Marie's life. She wrote this book so well it was like I was there observing Marie in person the whole time.

While some details of the book were gruesome, they provide a realistic view of slavery and the brutality of the South in the s.

At the same time, the author developed the characters into a rich tapestry that wove voodoo, Christianity, faith and hope for a New World against the backdrop of New Orleans.

The author not only endears the reader to Marie, but also to her line of ancestors, especially her relationship with Grandmere.

I haven't read such a powerfully, beautifully written book as this in a long time. Indeed, the memory of Marie and her courage to listen to her heart while battling her troubled soul will stay with me for a long time.

It is no wonder that she was loved and adored by so many. I feel the same way about her. May the spirit of Marie live forever in the hearts of those who believed in her, and still do to this day.

Thank you, Jewell Parker Rhodes! A very well written novel. A Christian wavering in their faith might understand the danger of living between two beliefs.

The writer contrasted the hypocrisy of faith; both Christian and Voodoo. This story pointed out how gullible believers can be when they follow a leader blindly.

In this book ignorance was not bliss. Charlatans paid a high price in the end. Definitely in the top 5 of my all time favorites.

A dark shadow creeping into my sleep. Dec 09, Sarah Carter rated it really liked it Shelves: First things first, this is not a horror novel.

While it has elements of the supernatural certainly, it is not chills and gore. What it is, is a superb historical novel reminding me a lot of the works of Phillipa Gregory.

Because I was expecting a darker tale my bad , it took me a while to really bed down with this book. However it was totally worth it. I've already got Voodoo First things first, this is not a horror novel.

Oct 24, Alcqueline rated it liked it. I enjoyed reading this mystery. The momentum of the story picked up after the initial hospital scene. Marie Laveau may be a better detective than a doctor.

She has a great gift, but is in denial about it. I love the setting in Southern Louisiana. Mar 09, PJ rated it liked it.

This book fed nicely into my longtime love affair with New Orleans. Oct 31, Katrina rated it really liked it Shelves: I think this was a wonderful historical novel; and I learned alot about Voodoo.

I can't wait to read more from Jewell Parker Rhodes. Jan 26, Cathy Douglas rated it it was ok Shelves: I started this book thinking I was going to love it, but never did finish.

I felt the author's modern viewpoint stuffed Marie's. When I read historical fiction, I prefer the illusion of going back in time, not having the author on my back, pointing out the sights over my shoulder.

The book has some things going for it: I have a feeling this is an author who will age well. Feb 28, Paula rated it liked it.

I listened to this on audio and it was interesting but as it was a novel I'm not sure how much was based on fact. I think I would like to read a book on Marie Laveau that is more non fiction.

Jul 11, Nicole rated it really liked it. Aug 15, Kathleen Valentine rated it really liked it. Jewell Parker Rhodes has a distinguished background.

As an African-American woman of considerable accomplishment her perspective on Marie Laveau is considerably different from that of Francine Prose but both are equally fascinating.

Rhodes' Marie Laveau is very much a woman of her times, a free black woman raised by a grandmother who Dr. Rhodes' Marie Laveau is very much a woman of her times, a free black woman raised by a grandmother who was once a slave.

She may be a free woman in the sense of not being owned by a white master but freedom in her time was nothing we would call freedom.

As a child young Marie longs to be reunited with her beautiful Maman. By the time Marie is 12 Grandmere reluctantly agrees to return to New Orleans and in short order Marie meets three men who will determine the course of her life: Jacques Paris, her future husband; John, the voodoo practitioner, and Louis, a white Yankee journalist who loves Marie despite her rejection of him.

Very little is known about Jacques Paris and Voodoo John Louis, as far as I can tell, is a totally fictional character but in Rhodes' recreation of the story both become irresistible characters.

Jacques is a handsome sailor who rescues Marie from the wrath of a brutal white aristocrat and marries her.

John is a controlling, manipulative, power-hungry voodoo practitioner who enslaves her sexually, just as he did her beautiful mother, and her own grandmother before her.

Set against the turbulent era of pre-Civil War slavery the story unfolds with Marie beginning to understand the scope of her own power and the desperation of the people free blacks, slaves, and former slaves who come to her desperate for a little bit of hope and dreaming of a tiny bit of power, if only the power to own their own lives.

Freedom might sound wonderful but the reality of it is very different when even free blacks can be beaten, abused, and murdered with no consequences.

As Marie's power and reputation grows she realizes that her powers are not what are important, it is her appearance of power that is a source of comfort and hope to the people who follow her.

Though John controls Marie and uses her beauty and growing reputation to put on spectacular shows for the increasing number of followers, he also resents her.

He resents her power and he resents the love people have for her. To me it was entirely believable that, while protecting Marie from the desires and manipulation of the white aristocrats who desired her, John was every bit as cruel, demanding, and enslaving as they were.

Rhodes creates hims as a sort of 19th century Ike Turner and it works. But Marie is growing up. As she comes into her own power and realizes that she has grown past John's power to contain her she becomes the powerful, fascinating symbol of feminine strength and self-determination the blacks of New Orleans longed for to look up to and draw courage from.

There is much color and ceremony in her tale and some intriguing touches of mysticism but overall it is a well-crafted depiction of a regrettable time in American history and of one woman who rose to a degree of power despite the limitations of the times.

I see Rhodes has written two more novels, contemporary ones, that imagine a modern day descendent of Marie Laveau who is now a doctor in a New Orleans hospital.

I ordered them from Amazon and look forward to reading them. Jan 14, Ellee rated it really liked it Recommends it for: This book takes place before the Civil War and paints a vivid picture of the city at that time.

Voodoo Dreams is a coming-of-age story wrapped up in spicy Creole Louisiana, slavery, and - of course - voodoo. It's also a self-awakening story as Marie tries to find out who she is and what her purpose in life is - which is something all of us can relate to.

I cannot stress enough what a gifted storyteller Jewell This novel by Jewell Parker Rhodes is another excellent snapshot of life in New Orleans. I cannot stress enough what a gifted storyteller Jewell Parker Rhodes is!

There is something for everyone in this book, but the story belongs to Marie. Rhodes draws a part of the soul into this story.

I suspect that Voodoo Dreams will appeal more to women than to men, but men with an interest in voodoo, New Orleans history, or who have read Interview With the Vampire will probably enjoy this book also.

Very highly recommended for all readers! Not overly violent or sexual, but this is not a "gentle" read. Nov 16, Ingrid Jennings rated it really liked it.

Today I finished reading Voodoo Dreams: It was her first novel. Her writing is very poetic. I watched her become possessed by Damballah and drop to the floor slithering like a snake.

I listened to the drum man and let the m Today I finished reading Voodoo Dreams: I listened to the drum man and let the music of his beats sway my body.

Then I closed the book to awaken to reality. For a first novel J. Rhodes did an exceptional job plotting Voodoo Dreams. It is a non-fictional account of the life of Marie Laveau a real voodoo queen from New Orleans.

When I begin reading I expected the character to be a strong woman with great power but instead J. Nov 01, Jeri Lane rated it it was ok.

I wanted to love this book I couldn't at all identify with the characters. Probably because i'm a middle aged white woman in the year , but still, there should be some humanity to the characters everyone can relate to.

You will not find this here. It was pretty graphic sexually and violently. The author made the book hard to read simply because the chapters all felt the same.

It was redundant and sad. I wanted to feel something for Marie I wanted to love this book I wanted to feel something for Marie Laveau, since I have heard so much about her in New Orleans history.

This book is a fictitious account of her, of course, which is good Otherwise I would give up on trying to learn more about her.

This book was strange. I'm sure others will enjoy it though. Apr 08, L. I love books about Voodoo and other traditions of folk magic.

This book was a decent attempt to fill in the gaps of the history of Marie Laveau the Elder, legendary queen of Voodoo. Like any work of historical fiction, it has its moments of extreme prejudice.

It is easy to romanticize the past, especially New Orleans in the s. Nonetheless, it was obvious that JPR did her research. I had this nagging feeling, though, tha I love books about Voodoo and other traditions of folk magic.

I had this nagging feeling, though, that she really wanted this to be Laveau's true history and perhaps could not imagine any other possibilities.

The result is a caricature that is as elusive as the woman herself. Jul 14, Magpie rated it liked it. Does not have reread value for me, but I think it is a must read.

New Orleans is historically romanticized as a wonderful carnival, but that is not the case. It has a dark and complex history revolving around slave culture that the author portrays.

I called the book sexually perverse, but even the bad guys are victims of the institution. Throw in the loss of culture and religion for imported slaves and the unfortunate relationships of the women of the Laveau family.

Many readers will not like th Does not have reread value for me, but I think it is a must read. Many readers will not like the book, but they will understand more of the US's history with slavery and why it should be the vilified institution it is.

Jul 04, Tami Montano rated it it was amazing. I felt an instant connection with this story as I first started in reading.

The characters were so tangible and real to me as a reader. I felt what the character struggled with in the story with redemption and trying to find her true self.

I love the setting of New Orleans and setting made the story that much more dramatic. Jewell Parker Rhodes is a conjurer of a good tales, I loved Hurricane as well.

She certainly can weave a reader into her stories. I look forward to reading more from this aut I felt an instant connection with this story as I first started in reading.

I look forward to reading more from this author. Dec 21, Miranda Heath rated it it was amazing. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. Marie Laveau has always fascinated me. I did my Social Studies project on Voodoo Experience, and lots of my "voodoo" searches came up with her of course.

This book is really creeping me out, but it's soo awesome I found myself crying all throughout. Her tale is so tragic at some points, yet so joyful at others.

I loved the ending. I was in love with Jacques, and it killed me to see him die Beautifu Marie Laveau has always fascinated me.

Dec 27, Tracy rated it liked it Recommends it for: This book was not what I expected, so perhaps I am being harsh in giving it 3 stars If I could I would rate it 3.

I was expecting a book that explained more about the voodoo religion and the strong woman who is still remembered today.

This was more of a social timepiece about slavery and misogyne. I will not be reading the second book in the series h This book was not what I expected, so perhaps I am being harsh in giving it 3 stars If I could I would rate it 3.

I will not be reading the second book in the series however that is just personal choice. Sep 01, Yvonne Loveday rated it really liked it. This one was a page turner, but I think it just barely makes its classification as historical fiction.

Four or five of the six main characters didn't exist. One did, but has no historical connection to Marie Laveau.

I don't know enough about the genre to know if that is unusual. But there was a Marie and Voudou and century New Orleans--all of which made for a very compelling story.

It was hard to put down at times.

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